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World Cup 2014… what should employers do to prepare?

With just a few days to go before the World Cup kicks off, if they have not done so already employers should be considering the potential effects of this latest major sporting event on their business.  The main issues for employers will be requests for annual leave, sickness absence, and website use during working hours.

What can employers do to prepare?

In summary…

In aiming for business continuity, it makes sense for employers to be:

Finally, we would emphasise that employers should ensure consistency in their treatment of employees.

Contact Information

If you would like any further advice on absence management or disciplinary procedures please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 1604 871143

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

Updated: by FG Solicitors
Call us on:  0808 172 93 22

WORLD CUP 2014… WHAT SHOULD EMPLOYERS DO TO PREPARE?

With just a few days to go before the World Cup kicks off, if they have not done so already employers should be considering the potential effects of this latest major sporting event on their business.  The main issues for employers will be requests for annual leave, sickness absence, and website use during working hours.

What can employers do to prepare?

  • Decide on a policy for dealing with annual leave requests.  If the normal holiday request procedure is to apply, employers should remind employees of this.  If new procedures are to be put in place temporarily, highlight these to employees in good time and ensure that they are applied consistently.
  • Remind employees of the absence notification/management procedures and the potential that they could be subject to disciplinary procedures if they are not genuinely sick but provide sickness as the reason for their absence.  Absence levels should be monitored during this period to identify particularly high levels of sickness absence or even post match hangovers.
  • Flexible working may be a consideration, allowing employees to come in later or finish sooner but agreeing when this time can be made up. Employees should also be permitted to swap shifts. This approach should be applied consistently and employees should be made aware that any change to their normal working arrangements should be agreed in advance.
  • Allow staff to watch the television or listen to the radio in a communal area.  This could offer an alternative to employees tempted to either “pull a sickie” to watch the games or to view them at work on the internet.
  • There may be an increased use of Social Media such as Facebook or Twitter or websites covering the World Cup. Employers should ensure that they have a clear policy regarding web use setting out that monitoring will take place, what use is permitted and what the likely sanctions are for a breach of the policy.
  • Whilst watching a match some employees may enjoy a drink or two. Employees should be reminded that if they are found to be under the influence of alcohol or drinking at work, they will be subject to disciplinary action.  Any no alcohol policy should be clearly publicised.

In summary…

In aiming for business continuity, it makes sense for employers to be:

  • Flexible – in altering working hours to accommodate viewing.
  • Clear – in relation to expectations of leave requests, absence and performance.
  • Communicative – discuss these matters with employees as soon as possible and continue to remind them of policies.
  • Fair - in particular with respect to the way in which requests for time off are dealt with.

Finally, we would emphasise that employers should ensure consistency in their treatment of employees.

Contact Information

If you would like any further advice on absence management or disciplinary procedures please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 1604 871143

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.