Category Archives: Our services

Farewell EU – What Now?

Union Jack-01

“The will of the people must be respected” says Prime Minister David Cameron on the outcome of the UK referendum on membership of the EU. One can’t escape the view that this should read “the will of the people must be interpreted.”

As of 6.00 am today, we as a nation appear to have become victims of unanticipated consequences, and are now at the mercy of outcomes that are not the ones foreseen and intended by our purposeful actions. I fear that full appreciation of the consequences of our actions will not be achieved for some time as predictions indicate that it will take at least 2 years to achieve disentanglement from our European partners.

In the immediate haze of global reaction, currency free-fall, stock exchange hysteria and concern about future trading conditions with the remaining 27 member states of the European Union, there is a risk that UK businesses may defer undertaking a strategic review of the impact on their workforce resulting from Brexit. In the short term, the biggest risk to workforce productivity will be uncertainty, particularly for those members of the workforce that are EU nationals and those that are British nationals working throughout the EU, currently estimated to be around 1 million. The uncertainty could manifest itself in key individual members of the workforce exiting of their own accord to seek greater stability elsewhere. It is essential that individual businesses develop effective operational and communication strategies without delay!

As UK businesses grapple with the challenges of negotiating commercial trade agreements in the new post EU membership world of tariffs and barriers to entry, it is a realistic possibility that revenue streams will become less profitable and this may inevitably lead to a rebalancing of profit margins by reducing headcount. A strategic review now, if operational effectiveness is to be maintained, will be well worth the effort.

And what, I hear you cry, of existing EU Legislation? The short answer is that a lot of EU laws are already incorporated into our domestic legislation through Acts of Parliament and Regulations, while there may very well be some tinkering in the medium to long term, it is unlikely, in this employment lawyer’s view, that our exit from the EU will result in any wholesale overhaul of our domestic employment legislation.

When the dust finally settles on the UK’s exit from the EU, the issue of Border controls and immigration status will become a further challenge for UK business whether domiciled in the UK or within the EU and using UK labour. While this may very well be 2 years away, businesses are encouraged to consider the implications now and devise a strategy to deal with potential key skills loss, recruitment and succession planning.

For advice and assistance with any employment law, HR or corporate immigration issue contact FG Solicitors on 01604 871143 or visit our website at www.fgsolicitors.co.uk for further information.

Resolving Employment Disputes

10032845_mSUMMARY: What do you do when a tribunal claim is brewing…. Fight or Flight?

Whilst the number of tribunal claims are down, claims are still happening; unfair dismissal claims still prevail but often more complex issues such as discrimination and whistleblowing are involved.

Being on the receiving end of a tribunal claim can feel acutely painful from both a time and costs perspective. The following are a few simple do’s and don’ts to help manage a dispute which is brewing.

DO consider all the options for dealing with a dispute or a tribunal claim.

For example:

  • Acas Early Conciliation

Before a claim can be started an employee must contact Acas; Acas will then establish if the employee and employer can resolve the dispute without the tribunal’s intervention. Neither party has to participate in the process and if settlement cannot be reached, the employee is then free to claim.

Even if there is no interest in settlement, this process may serve as a reconnaissance exercise to understand more about the employee’s complaint in preparation for defending any subsequent claim.

  • Defend the case

Some employers may prefer not to shy away from the gaze of the tribunal because the complaint requires a robust response.  For example:

  • there is no case to answer;
  • the employee’s settlement expectations are unrealistic; or
  • there may be important financial and commercial considerations. Disabusing staff of a settlement culture may be one reason. Broader issues may also be at stake, which relate to pay, hours and holidays.
  • Judicial Mediation

Mediation has the advantage of taking place in a less formal setting in comparison with a full tribunal hearing. The mediator, an employment judge, will work with the parties on a confidential and without prejudice basis to explore if there is a way of resolving the dispute.  The parties are free to discuss their differences and consider the options for resolving the dispute, without the fear of their discussions being repeated if the mediation fails.

Agreement can be reached on matters which a tribunal would not be able to address. For example, the employee leaving, an apology or a reference being issued, or the employee being provided with assistance to find another job.

From an employer’s perspective a satisfactory commercial outcome, without having to concede its position can often be achieved.

  • Settle the case before the hearing

Once a tribunal claim has been issued, the Acas conciliation service will still be available to consider with the parties whether there is a solution. Settlement agreements can also be used.

DON’T ignore a tribunal claim once received.

Employers only have 28 days from the date when the claim is sent to respond to the tribunal setting out why the claim is disputed.  A response will usually be rejected if received after the expiry of the 28-day time limit.  Possible consequences are that a judgment could be issued without the employer being able to defend its position. This could be costly as compensation for discrimination claims is uncapped, and the maximum compensatory award for unfair dismissal from 6 April 2016 is the lower of £78,962, or one year’s pay.

Until and unless settlement is properly concluded, a response must always be filed.

DO consider ways to limit an employee’s opportunity to bring a claim in the first place.

Effective ways to reduce the risk include:

  • having legally compliant contracts of employment and policies and procedures;
  • introducing a robust appraisal system and ensuring current job descriptions exist;
  • communicating to staff the expected workplace standard of behaviour to reduce the risk of harassment and discrimination claims; and
  • dealing promptly and fairly with grievances and whistleblowing complaints.

DON’T forget …..

…. if a dispute arises, a sound strategy, which acknowledges the needs of your organisation and the merits of the complaint, will go a long way towards finding the right solution, whether that be a hard fight in the tribunal or a quick exit via the settlement route.

Contact Details

If you would like to identify the right strategy for your employment disputes, please contact a member of our Employment Law team:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

Safe Harbor – Shipping Out?

160212 Data TransferSUMMARY: Employers who transfer employees’ personal data to a US office should be aware that they can no longer rely on the Safe Harbor decision to comply with data protection laws.

A recent European ruling means that the Safe Harbor decision is invalid.  Since then, employers have wanted to understand what this means in relation to transferring employees’ personal data; below are some frequently asked questions.

Q1: What is the Safe Harbor decision?

The Safe Harbor decision previously enabled certified organisations to transfer personal data from the EU to the US without breaching European data protection laws.

The Snowden revelations about the US National Security Agency’s surveillance of data held by Safe Harbor participants meant that Safe Harbor’s credibility was seriously undermined.  The revelation indicates that the US is not ensuring an adequate level of protection for personal data.

Subsequently, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has held that the Safe Harbor arrangement is invalid.

Q2: Does the ECJ’s decision concern our organisation?

Personal data transfers between the EU and the US

If your organisation transfers personal data between the EU and the US it will be of concern; you can no longer rely on the Safe Harbor decision when transferring such data.

The European Commission is attempting to agree a new Safe Harbor package but has not given any time frame for finalising this.

Continuing to transfer data on this basis therefore carries a level of risk.  We suggest ways in which you can manage risk in relation to this at question 3.

Personal data transfers within the EU

If your organisation only transfers personal data within the EU, this decision will not affect you.

Q3: If we cannot rely on the Safe Harbor framework, what are the alternatives?

EU organisations should now consider alternatives to the Safe Harbor when transferring personal data to the US.  These include:

1. Having an employee’s informed express written consent.  Consent may, however, be withdrawn at any time.  Note that it may be considered unfair to make it a contractual requirement for an employee to consent to a transfer of his/her data to the US.

2. Implementing the following:

  • Model contracts – contracts adopted by the European Commission which provide standard wording for the transfer outside the EU; and
  • Binding Corporate Rules – a set of approved internal Codes of Conduct.  The EU’s Article 29 Data Protection Working Party have developed a number of documents to assist.

3. Anonymising or pseudonymising data exported from the EU to the US.

A paper trail should always be kept of any steps taken.

Q4: What are the possible sanctions if we transfer personal data to the US without appropriate alternatives in place?

Legal sanctions in the UK, if the organisation breaches data protection legislation, include:

  • a fine of up to £500,000;
  • the Information Commissioner taking enforcement action against the organisation; and
  • conviction for a criminal offence (which could result in an unlimited fine).

Organisations should also be aware that a breach of the Data Protection Act 1998 is likely to result in damaging adverse publicity and individuals could bring a civil claim against the organisation.

Contact Details

For more details about the issues in this article or if you would like a data protection policy, which we advise all organisations to have, please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

Engaging With Your Workforce

Engaging With Your WorkforceSUMMARY: Staff turnover can prove costly and also cause difficulties in attracting new recruits. It is therefore important that employers consider how they attract and retain the best talent.

Is it all about the money?

To have strongly defined recruitment and retention strategies an organisation needs to understand what motivates its staff.

Often it is mistakenly assumed that it is all about the money. This is not usually the case. One of our clients recently reported that an employee had turned down a job with a competitor, even though the salary was higher. The employee apparently had no qualms in turning down the offer because it was not just about the money.

Financial reward will undeniably play a significant role in any recruitment and retention strategy but there are many other factors which will influence an individual’s decision to stay or indeed join another organisation.

Why identify what motivates your workforce?

An organisation successful in retaining its current workforce is likely to be meeting the needs of its staff which, in turn, means it is probably also attracting new recruits. This organisation is likely to have taken the time to consider what drives individuals – identifying their needs, expectations, and values.

Whilst not purely a legal matter, we are often asked to advise on how an organisation can identify what is important to its staff and in particular, what steps can be taken to obtain employee feedback.

Taking stock, whilst providing an invaluable insight into what motivates individuals will also add further value – there is likely to be a greater feeling of inclusion leading to increased employee engagement; reduced absence levels; lower staff turnover; becoming known as a “good employer” to work for; less workplace conflict; fewer disciplinaries and grievances; less tribunal claims; increased productivity; higher profitability rates; and surprisingly some innovative ideas to improve the business may also be identified.

How to identify what makes a “great place to work”?

There are many different ways of gaining an increased understanding of the issues that are most important to individuals. For example,

  • through the running of employee forums, focus groups and staff meetings;
  • via suggestion boxes;
  • setting up dream/vision boarding exercises;
  • exit interviews; and
  • by implementing staff engagement surveys.

Staff engagement surveys usually offer the best opportunity to facilitate real business improvement on a more formal basis. Committing to such a formal process demonstrates to staff that they are being taken seriously. In turn, staff are more likely to want to contribute.

A survey can take the form of either a number of generic questions or more importantly, where needs and values are being identified, bespoke questions tailored to address particular or unique circumstances. Fundamentally, any questions must be aligned with the organisation’s overall strategy if the results are to add value. The results will also provide invaluable data to be benchmarked for comparison purposes including looking at industry specific data, to understand how the organisation performs alongside other organisations; this may be important when reviewing any recruitment and retention strategy.

Surveys can be carried out in a variety of different ways such as over the telephone, as paper based exercises or on-line. Some survey providers are now coming up with more creative ideas to get the required results. Important in all cases is that staff are provided with anonymity and the opportunity to offer their opinions on a confidential basis.

Before engaging in any exercise there are some key considerations:

  1. How will the process be managed and communicated?
  2. How will the expectations of participants be managed in terms of deliverable outcomes including sharing the results (warts and all)?
  3. Will there be a willingness to take action?

What might the results say?

The results of any staff feedback exercise are likely to identify that staff have a variety of different values.

If the focus has been on retention then it is likely to become clear that for many individuals money is not the main motivator. Increasingly catching up, and in some instances overtaking financial reward, main motivators are flexible working arrangements, homeworking, challenging and stimulating work, structured career development prospects and recognition for going above and beyond within peer groups.

The example referred to above supports these results; the employee cited a number of reasons for staying including a supportive culture, interesting and varied work, and a flexible working arrangement which provided a good work/life balance.

For some individuals money will be of paramount importance and for others it will be a flexible package. Get it right and the workforce will be more engaged and far more likely to stay; a highly engaged workforce is also likely to attract the best talent.

Contact Details

For more details please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

Misconduct & Punishment in Employment

Punishment at workSummary: Disagreement between employer and employee is as old as the very concept of Master and Servant itself. As a general rule, where disagreement ends with an employer forming the view that an ending of the relationship is the outcome it desires, there are some mandatory steps that will need to be addressed.

An employer seeking to dismiss an employee will generally have to consider 2 key areas of law:

  1. the first answers the question, what if anything is owed to the employee as a result of the ending of the employment? – the contractual question;
  2. the second, is the dismissal fair in all the circumstances? – the protection afforded to the employee by Parliament; the statutory question.

The first question is arguably the one to answer. Consider the case of an employer wishing to terminate the employment of an employee for misconduct who has a contract entitling them to 6 months’ notice. Except for where the misconduct is of such an extreme nature that it amounts to gross misconduct, ending the employment without payment is likely to give rise to a successful breach of contract claim.

In a recent case, the High Court decided that an employee who sent a pornographic e-mail from a work account had committed an act which entitled his employer to dismiss him without paying him the 12 months’ notice to which he was entitled. This was in spite of the fact that the sending of the e-mail was discovered some 5 years after it had been sent and only as part of a fishing exercise conducted by the employer, specifically to find a reason to dismiss.

It is extremely important that an employer intending to dismiss in these circumstances does not, after discovery of the conduct, behave in a way that would lead to a view that it had waived its right to dismiss in these circumstances.

By contrast, whether or not the dismissal was fair, in all the circumstances, would largely depend on the procedure leading up to the decision to dismiss. In short, did the employer have a reasonable belief in the guilt of the employee based on the employer having undertaken a reasonable investigation? Finally, whether the decision to dismiss in those circumstances, as opposed to applying some other sanction, was reasonable.

Tackling the risk of a successful unfair dismissal claim is a juggling act requiring an employer to engage in a fair procedure free from bias, permitting the employee an opportunity to properly understand the allegations, to address them and to be accompanied if requested.

Having managed all of that, dismissing the employee as a result of the allegations must, on an objective view, be action that a reasonable employer would take. Applying this thinking to the case mentioned above, while the age of the offence might not matter, particularly if the employer had no knowledge of it, the decision to go on a fishing expedition to find misconduct that would allow an employer to dismiss for gross misconduct and in so doing avoid the obligation to pay notice, may very well be considered unfair. This is so even if in so doing the employer would not be in breach of contract.

Other considerations:

  • Ensure that if contemplating dismissing for gross misconduct, and your policies define types of conduct that you consider fall within that category, the current offence does not fall outside it. In a recently decided case where a tribunal found the dismissal of an employee to be unfair, one of the factors that influenced the finding that the dismissal was unfair was the fact that the employer’s policy stated that the offence which the employee was facing would be dealt with by a maximum sanction of a written warning.
  • Ensure that you follow your own laid down procedures.
  • Ensure your investigation is thorough, including follow up investigations.
  • Ensure the process is well documented including witness evidence and statements.
  • Wherever possible, ensure that each level of the process is chaired by someone different.
  • Permit an appeal.

Above all, obtain proper advice and support.

Contact Details

For more details please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

New Protection for Zero Hours

Contract being tornZero Hours Contract

Zero hours contracts are contracts between an employer and a worker and/or an employee and provide that the employer is not obliged to provide them with any minimum working hours, and the worker and/or employee is not obliged to accept any of the hours offered.

A ban on exclusivity clauses since May 2015

Zero hours contracts have often historically included exclusivity clauses which prevent workers and employees from working for another employer. Whilst it remains permissible for a business to use zero hours contracts, exclusivity clauses in these types of contract have been banned since 26 May 2015.

New protection for workers as from 11 January 2016 

As of today, real protection has been introduced for those engaged on zero hours contracts which include exclusivity clauses:

  • zero hours employees have the right not to be unfairly dismissed if the reason, or principal reason for their dismissal, is that they have failed to comply with an exclusivity clause. Employees do not need two years’ service to be able to bring their claim; and
  • zero hours employees and workers have the right not to be subjected to a detriment for failing to comply with an exclusivity clause.  A detriment could be the decision not to offer further work.

Where these rights have been breached, employees and workers may issue a claim in the tribunal and seek a declaration and/or compensation.

Are Legal Highs a Workplace Issue?

DrugsSUMMARY: Use of legal highs has increased recently – how can employers manage this in the workplace?

The increase in the use of legal highs is now widely publicised.  Given this increase, the reality is that some employees may be at work under the influence.  This could present employers with two main problems: impaired employee performance; and serious health and safety implications for both the employer and the employee.

Whilst some employers may dismiss this issue on the basis it is unlikely to be a significant concern for them, the following points are worth noting when deciding whether to be proactive:

  1. Many so called “legal highs” are actually illegal.
  2. The drugs can have the same effects on users as some more traditional illegal substances.
  3. During 2014 in England, such drugs were implicated in 129 deaths.
  4. Legislation is currently going through Parliament to ban the supply of these drugs.

We would therefore recommend the following action points for employers:

  1. Update policies – consider how this issue can be covered in alcohol and drugs policies.  Employers should have clear rules about coming to work under the influence of drugs and alcohol and about taking drugs or drinking at work.  Legal highs can be treated in the same way as other drugs would be.  If policies are unclear, this is the time to update them.
  2. Remind – remind employees attending work under the influence of drugs that the use of legal highs at work is banned and ensure that they are aware of relevant policies and the potential sanctions for breaching these policies.
  3. Educate – educate staff and line managers on the signs of drug use, what to be aware of and the action they should take.

Contact Details

For more details about the issues in this employment law article or if you would like an alcohol and drugs policy please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

On the 8th Day of Christmas…

8th Day of ChristmasOn the 8th day of Christmas my employee said to me…. “I didn’t enjoy the Christmas party as one of my colleagues kept harassing me.”

With the ever increasing demands of work the Christmas party is a great way to say thank you to staff. Most employees, when entering into the party spirit, will remember that there is a need to convey some semblance of good behaviour; sometimes, however a small number of staff are forgetful of this and lose all sense of propriety. In most instances their behaviour will be mildly amusing or annoying but in some cases it can become offensive and distressing.

Regardless of whether the party is away from the workplace and/or not in work time, employment law will still apply. This means employees who behave inappropriately towards their colleagues can be held accountable for their behaviour. Additionally, employers can be held responsible for the conduct of an employee towards a colleague where bullying, harassment and discrimination is involved.

It is therefore important to take seriously complaints of this type and not treat them any differently because the behaviour complained of occurred at a social event. Ignoring such a complaint could lead to a costly employment tribunal claim and reputational damage. Key considerations for an employer wishing to minimise these risks include:

  • Ensuring the complaint is dealt with quickly and impartially under the grievance procedure – the procedure should include the usual stages such as an investigation, meetings and an appeal.
  • Taking disciplinary action if the complaint is upheld.

However, proactive employers can also take preventative steps to minimise the risk of complaints in the first place, such steps can include:

  • Implementing and communicating an equality and harassment policy.
  • Providing equal opportunities training.
  • Dealing with complaints fairly and effectively.

Implementation of these simple steps should enable everyone to focus on the true purpose of the event and have fun at this time of year.

Contact Details

For more details about the issues in this article please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

On the 5th Day of Christmas…

5th Day of ChristmasOn the 5th day of Christmas my employee said to me… “My childcare arrangements for the Christmas holiday period have just fallen through.”

An acceptable solution to help the employee, particularly if time needs to be taken off at short notice, may be readily identifiable.  If this is not possible, the employee may have to rely on the statutory dependent care leave regime to take time off.  The right would be triggered where the breakdown in child care arrangements was unforeseen and is an emergency.

Unless the contract of employment provides otherwise, the right to such leave is unpaid.

The employee is unlikely to be able to use dependent care leave to cover the entire school holiday period.  The right is to a reasonable amount of time off – normally a day or two is anticipated to allow the employee to sort out the emergency and make alternative arrangements.  Each case is likely to be different and needs to be considered on its own set of facts. In considering what is reasonable and necessary the following is relevant:

  • the nature of the emergency;
  • the relationship between the dependent and the employee;
  • the extent to which the employee can call upon someone else for help or make alternative arrangements; and
  • the length of time the employee had to explore alternative arrangements -  the longer the time the employee had to explore alternative arrangements, the less likely it would be necessary to have time off.

The operational needs of the business and any disruption caused are irrelevant considerations for an employer when determining if leave should be permitted.

To request this type of leave the employee is required to:

  • tell the employer as soon as possible the reason for the absence;
  • indicate how long they expect to be absent; and
  • provide sufficient information to establish the right to take dependent care leave.

To enable employees to understand the parameters of this statutory right, and to ensure that any request for this type of leave is dealt with fairly and consistently, employers are advised to have a clearly communicated policy. As a minimum this policy should address the following:

  • when an employee may take unpaid time off to care for their dependants, who may not always be children;
  • the process for requesting the leave;
  • details of the evidence required to support the request;
  • any sanctions for abusing the policy; and
  • details of the other rights available including  unpaid parental leave, annual leave or flexible working arrangements.

Contact Details

For more details about the issues in this article please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172 93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.

Christmas for Employers – Naughty or Nice?

Naughty or niceEmployment law dos and don’ts at Christmas-time for parties and presents.

Yes it’s that time of the year again: hyperactive children, unsuitable presents and parties where guests outstay their welcome. And that’s just the staff! In fact the Christmas spirit (and I’m not referring to the alcoholic one) can be found in the workplace and with some careful planning it can be a “nice” time of the year.  It is however useful to remember the employment law implications of festive activities. With this in mind, we have set out below some of the dos and don’ts at Christmas-time in terms of employment law.

PARTIES

When parties are going with alcohol flowing, the risk of injury to employees both physically and mentally increases.  Below are some pointers to help mitigate these risks so that everyone enjoys this time of the year.

BEFORE/DURING THE EVENT

DO   DO NOT  
Consider sending a memo/email to employees about standards of conduct required at office functions and the disciplinary sanctions which could result from breaches of these standards. Encourage drunkenness, drugs or violence at the party.  A free bar for the whole evening may encourage heavy drinking.
Ensure that all employees are invited to an office party, even if they are off sick or some form of family friendly leave. Deliberately leave out any employee from participating in festive events.
Ensure the company’s policy on harassment is up to date and remind employees of its existence well in advance.  Guidance may be needed on appropriate “secret santa” gifts (for example, nothing lewd which could be perceived as offensive!). Hold the party at a venue which would not be suitable for some employees to attend due to, for example, disability or religious reasons.
   
Ensure that the venue for the party is accessible by disabled employees. Assume that everyone will eat the same food or refuse to accommodate dietary requests.
Ask employees about dietary requirements  – employees who have certain religious beliefs may be vegetarian or unable to eat beef or pork for example. Leave junior employees to organise a large office party without guidance as to the necessary health and safety requirements.
Ensure there are sufficient security measures in place at the venue. Assume that all partners will be of the opposite sex.
If partners are invited to the party, ensure that the invitation is to any partners, heterosexual or homosexual. Discuss career potential or remuneration with employees at a social event – these conversations can be taken out of context and are open to misinterpretation.
Warn managers not to discuss career potential or remuneration with subordinates at the party – words of encouragement and good intentions can end up being misinterpreted.
Remember that employer-provided annual parties are not taxable as employee benefits so long as the employer spends less than £150 a head.
AFTER THE EVENT 
Consider warning staff that unauthorised absence the day after the party may result in disciplinary action. Use lateness/absence the day after the party as an excuse to instigate disciplinary proceedings against a particular employee, when other employees have been allowed to get away with similar lateness/absence.
Consider how employees will get home from the venue.  Consider booking taxis or sending out train times. Allow employees to drive home after over-indulging.
Follow up any grievances or complaints raised following a party. Ignore complaints or grievances, particularly in relation to sexual harassment.
Investigate any incident as soon and as fully as possible.  If any serious incidents occur (for example violence or sexual harassment), invoke the disciplinary procedure. Encourage gossip after the office Christmas party.
Try to stamp out any gossip after a social event.  It could for example be interpreted as harassment.  

 

PRESENTS

And here are a couple of notes on present giving:

DO DO NOT
Include all employees if you are intending to give gifts. Discriminate against any individual employees when giving gifts.  For example by giving alcohol to an employee whose religious beliefs require abstinence.
Check the examples given by HMRC of “trivial” gifts which may be given to employees without a tax charge.  For example, a turkey, a bottle of wine, chocolates…  

Contact Details

For more details about Christmas parties or company policies please contact:

fgmedia@fgsolicitors.co.uk

+44 (0) 808 172  93 22

This update is for general guidance only and does not constitute definitive advice.